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LESSON 1

SITTING DOWN

Hi there! Welcome to the
beginners' class.

You don't know anything
about bridge, right?
Not to worry.

I knew nothing when I
started out, and look
at me now!

Uh, never mind.
1.1 The clock table
 

Let's begin. You need four
players to play bridge.

You sit around a square
table like this one. You
could think of it as a
square clock if you like.
1.2 What time is it?  

One player sits at 12
o'clock, one at 3 o'clock,
one at 6 o'clock and one
at 9 o'clock.

Instead of calling the seats
by the hour, we call them
by the name of the four
directions, North, East,
South and West.

Sort of like a compass.
1.3 Newspaper daily column  

When you look at a bridge
diagram in the newspaper,
you'll see a position like this.

Have you ever seen a bridge
diagram in the newspaper?

Almost every newspaper
has a daily bridge column
(or at least a Sunday
column) so take a look.


The Sunday Telegraph


 
North

A
8 4
7 5 3
J 8 7 5
Q J 5
 
West
6

9 6 2
Q 4 3
A K 9 6 3 2
East
Q J 9

A K Q J 8 4
6 2
8 7
South
dealer
South
K 10 7 5 3 2

10
A K 10 9
10 4
 
1.4 Want to play South?  
 
 
 
 

Suppose you don't know
who the people are. You
can call each player by
his "direction" - in other
words, the player sitting
in the 6 o'clock spot
will be called "South."

If the newspaper column
says, "South dealer" that
means that the "6 o'clock
player" dealt the cards
this time.
1.5 West, North, East, South, West, North ...  

Someone shuffles the cards
and then all 52 cards in the
pack are dealt -- no jokers --
one at a time around the
table, face down.

If one
card is missing from
the deck, you have to find
the missing card or get a
new deck. This game
cannot be played with even
one card missing!

 
 
 
 

1.6 Clockwise  

Bridge is played CLOCKWISE. When you deal the cards you
deal one card to the player
on your left, then the player
across the table from you,
then the player on your right,
and then yourself
last - CLOCKWISE
 

 


Place cursor
over Sharon
to deal cards

 

1.7 Hand  
 

 




 

 

Each player receives
13 cards.

Each player picks up his
cards and arranges them
in his hand -- don't let the
other players see your
cards!At the start of the
deal, they are your 13
cards and you call those
13 cards your "hand."


1.8 Tricks  

There are 13 tricks in every
bridge deal. You probably
know about tricks from
playing "war" when you
were a little kid -- you
each played a card and
the higher card won.

In bridge there are 4 cards
in a trick instead of 2.
Thirteen times each player
will contribute one card
and somebody will win
the four cards (the trick).
 



 
 

1.9 The Goal  
 





 
 

Well, there are two goals,
really: You want to win as
many tricks as you can,
and the other goal is to
predict how many tricks
you are going to win!

You don't have to do
this all alone -- you
have a partner!
1.10 Partners  
 
 
 
 

You and the player opposite
you (North is opposite
South, and East is opposite
West) combine as a team!

The player opposite you is
called your "partner" and
you will be sharing with
him or her equally in the
good and the bad.

If you personally win ten
tricks, for example, your
partner also gets credit for
all ten tricks! And if he
wins ten tricks and you win
zero, you get credit for
ten, just as he does!
1.11 Partners and direction  

The two partnerships
are referred to by their
directions, so one
partnership is called
"North-South" and one is
called "East-West."
 
 


 


1.12 Opponents  
 
 

 


We call the other two
players our "opponents".

If you and your partner
are "North-South",
your opponents are
"East-West".

1.13 No people in the newspaper  

 

The Sunday Telegraph

 
North

A
8 4
7 5 3
J 8 7 5
Q J 5
 
West
6

9 6 2
Q 4 3
A K 9 6 3 2
East
Q J 9

A K Q J 8 4
6 2
8 7
South
dealer
South
K 10 7 5 3 2

10
A K 10 9
10 4

 

In a newspaper column, we
don't see the people, we
see only the cards.
1.14 And now, a small quiz  

Here's your chance to show
what you've learned.

Try this quiz and if you get
the right answers, you should continue to the next lesson.
See you later!

Questions
Move over ?
for answer


1.
Suppose you sit down in the West seat. Who is the player on your right (i.e., what direction is the guy on your right occupying?)

(A) North
(B) South
(C) East
(D) West


2
. Suppose you sit down in the North seat. Who is your partner (i.e., what direction is the guy across the table from you occupying)?

(A) North
(B) South
(C) East
(D) West


3
. Suppose you sit down in the South seat. How would you refer to you and your partner combined?

(A) Team A
(B) Team B
(C) North-South
(D) North-West
(E) North-East


4
. Suppose you sit down in the East seat and you are the dealer. To whom will you give the first card?

(A) North
(B) South
(C) East
(D) West


5.
Suppose South wins 10 tricks, and the other three players win one trick each. How many tricks is South credited with?

(A) 1 trick
(B) 2 tricks
(C) 3 tricks
(D) 10 tricks
(E) 11 tricks
(F) 12 tricks


6.
Suppose South wins 10 tricks, and the other three players win one trick each. How many tricks is North credited with?

(A) 1 trick
(B) 2 tricks
(C) 3 tricks
(D) 10 tricks
(E) 11 tricks
(F) 12 tricks


7.
Suppose South wins 10 tricks, and the other three players win one trick each. How many tricks is West credited with?

(A) 1 trick
(B) 2 tricks
(C) 3 tricks
(D) 10 tricks
(E) 11 tricks
(F) 12 tricks


8.
Suppose South wins 10 tricks, and the other three players win one trick each. How many tricks is East credited with?

(A) 1 trick
(B) 2 tricks
(C) 3 tricks
(D) 10 tricks
(E) 11 tricks
(F) 12 tricks

 

Scores

All six answers correct - well done!

Five answers out of six correct - good!

Four answers out of six correct - not bad!

0-3 answers out of five correct. Please review the lesson and try again.

Continue with nine more beginner lessons,
after signing up for the Novice Membership.

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